After many days

After many days, I stepped out of our apartment block, within our Whispering Palms Complex. Just a half-hour afternoon walk, to move my limbs and take in some sun.

With lockdown, understandably, there were just a few people around, going about their business. Cyclone Tauktae’s rains the other day have washed the trees and streets clean. The air too.

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The rain is no dampener

Continuous rains have lashed the city since the early hours of today. Lokhandwala Circle hasn’t got flooded since it was relaid a couple of years ago, but today was different.

The road became a river, washing away whatever could not resist the force of the swiftly moving water.

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Rain floods in the erstwhile lake bed

Yesterday it poured in Bangalore! 44 mm of rain in three hours according to weather reports (see here). Many roads almost became rivers, and many low-lying areas almost became ponds. After all, rain water from the roads and catchment areas needs to flow somewhere. If not into storm water drains, where ever it finds its way.

Today’s TOI newspaper shows the flooding at the centrally-located Kanteerava Stadium. One feels sad at the destruction caused. Creation of infrastructure on a lake bed (yes, Kandeerava Stadium is built on Sampangi Lake), combined with inadequate planning is surely a recipe for rain floods. Continue reading

Retrofitting RWH in houses

The Nagarajan house on Sarakki Main Road, JP Nagar 1st Phase, Bangalore looks just like any other house we commonly see in Bangalore. Built in 1981, on a 60 ft x 40 ft site, the single storey house was, at that time, at the southern most end of Bangalore city limits.

While building the house, no provision was made for rain water harvesting (RWH). “We built the house as economically as we could. I was working in HAL Hospital (located near the HAL Bangalore Airport at that time) so we did not need to worry about accommodation as we had the doctors’ quarters, but we wanted to build a house where we could live after my retirement. I took loans to buy the site and build the house.”, said Dr Nagarajan. The rain water from the roof and compound flowed off into the storm water drains which in turn flowed into the main canals and finally into the lakes of the vicinity. “Many people dig wells before construction of their houses, but we didn’t spend that extra amount on a well either.”, said Dr Nagarajan.  Continue reading